Monday, May 20, 2019

Nonfiction Monday


The Renaissance Explorers with History Projects for Kids, by Alicia Z. Klepeis is part of the Renaissance For Kids Series from Nomad Press. Klepeis structures her work around chapter biographies of Niccolo de Conti, Bartolomeu Dias, Vasco da Gama, Pero da Covilha, and Ferdinand Magellan in her focus on the lives of early European explorers.



An introduction, Exploration During the Renaissance, asks the question, “Why leave the comfort of home and family to strike out to new lands where danger might lurk?” Of course, there is the familiar answer, “Europeans were searching for a sea route to India and Asia.” But there were a number of other factors that influenced the timing of this exploration. Improvements in the technology of navigation, shipbuilding, and map making created better opportunities for success. European monarchs sponsored expeditions to expand empires, gain wealth, monopolize trade, and impose Christianity on indigenous people.

Each biographical chapter utilizes primary sources and a timeline to trace the life of an explorer and identify their contributions to the growing body of knowledge about exotic places and their people, culture, plants, and animals. Conti, a Venice merchant, self-funded his twenty-five-year-long expedition to Persia, India, Sumatra, and Borneo. He returned with information about the inhabitants as well as spices, animals, and geography. Dias was sent by King John II of Portugal to find a trade route to India. Dias was the first to sail around the Southern tip of Africa into the Indian Ocean before being forced to return home by his crew. Vasco da Gama, a Portuguese navigator, built on the experience of Dias and became the first to sail from Europe to India. Covilha traveled to India and Ethiopia as an emissary of King John II of Portugal, successfully establishing a relation between Portugal and Ethiopia. Magellan’s circumnavigation of the world changed navigation forever by improving maps and establishing new trading routes.
  
As with the other volumes in the series, readers are challenged to ask questions and use critical thinking skills in response to a series of hands-on projects that are offered at the end of each chapter. Maps, photographs and illustrations highlight the subjects and provide historical context. Multiple text boxes offer additional facts, quotes, and insights on a variety of topics from the famous Moroccan explorer Ibn Battuta to the use of an astrolabe for navigation. Calls to action are strategically placed throughout: Wonder Why? poses additional questions for consideration.  Connect contains QR codes for audio and video files. Words of Wonder directs readers to a multi-page glossary at the end of the book. Resources provides a list of books, videos, and museums for further exploration.

The book is well organized and the content expands on familiar facts and introduces readers to details that are often overlooked such as the cruelty that often accompanied the explorers in their encounters with people of other cultures or religions. The text and illustrations are richly detailed. The conversational tone and age-appropriate vocabulary is appealing.
Recommended for home and school libraries.

Friday, May 17, 2019

Picture Book Friday


Holy Squawkamole! By Susan Wood with illustrations by Laura Gonzalez is a lively twist on the traditional tale, The Little Red Hen.



In this rollicking Southwestern-themed story, the Little Red Hen hankers after some guacamole and tries to enlist the help of Coati, Armadillo, Snake, and Iguana to gather the ingredients from her garden and then mash and mix them in her cocina. True to the original plot, everyone has an excuse to avoid the work, but each is quick to offer to share in the treat. So, the Little Red Hen, la gallinita roja, gathers avocados, plucks tomatoes, digs onions, and snips cilantro all by herself. She mashes and mixes all by herself. Then … she adds a secret ingredient and invites all the lazy animals to share in the dish.

The lively text utilizes Spanish terms that are cleverly integrated into the narrative. Gonzalez’s vibrant illustrations are detailed and warmly appealing.

Wood enriches the content with two author notes: The History of Guacamole traces this delectable dish back to ahuacamolli (avocado sauce) first made by the Aztecs of Mexico in the 1300s. And there is also, La Gallinita Roja’s Guacamole Recipe with some helpful hints.

A glossary provides definitions for the Spanish terms.

Recommended for young readers or as a read aloud.

Friday, May 10, 2019

Picture Book Friday


When Grandma Gives You A Lemon Tree, the debut picture book by Jamie L.B. Deenihan with illustrations by Lorraine Rocha, is a light-hearted twist on the familiar phrase, “When life gives you lemons…”



In this instance, Deenihan imagines what would happen when a gadget-obsessed child, whose birthday wish list is laden with electronics, receives a lemon tree from Grandma instead. What’s the point of a lemon tree? It doesn’t do anything and it requires looking after. Told in the second person, the narrator begins by reminding the astounded child to mind her manners – No faces! No tears! And definitely, no tossing Grandma’s gift! Just smile and say thank you.

Once past her disappointment, the narrator gently guides the girl through the steps of caring for the young tree, sharing a wealth of valuable gardening information with the reader along the way. With the passage of time, the tree matures and so does the young gardener who discovers that there is something even more fun than growing, naming, and decorating her tree.  She can pick lemons, and with grandma’s help, make lemonade (the recipe is included) to sell on the sidewalk. Cash in hand, she heads to the store where we discover her passion has changed. She returns home, not with the once longed for technology, but with an abundance of plants to share with her urban neighbors!

Deenihan does more than celebrate the joys of a garden in this humorous tale. She subtly reminds us of the benefit to be found in patiently working toward a long-term goal, the joy of being outside in nature rather than cloistered with electronics, and the importance of community.

Rocha’s diverse cartoon-style characters are a perfect fit for the urban environment of the story. The illustrations are colorful and richly detailed, encouraging readers to take a second and third look.

A charming story that I happily recommend for home and school libraries!

Monday, May 6, 2019

Nonfriction Monday


The Renaissance Inventors with History Projects for Kids, by Alicia Z. Klepeis is part of the Renaissance For Kids Series from Nomad Press. Klepeis structures her work around chapter biographies of Johannes Gutenberg, Leon Battista Alberti, Leonardo da Vinci, Gerardus Mercator, and Galileo Galilei to introduce readers to the lives of some of the most prolific inventors of their time.



An introduction, Invention During the Renaissance, examines factors such as economic growth, expansion of trade, movement of people from farms to cities, and the increased number of educated individuals brought about by the availability of books that combined to create opportunities for invention.

Each biographical chapter utilizes primary sources and a timeline to trace the life of an inventor with careful attention paid to the obstacles met and overcome in their quest for discovery. Readers not only explore some of the more familiar inventions, but are also provided with additional information about lesser known successes.
Before Gutenberg could make his idea for a printing press a reality, he had to create a metal that could be used to form the letters, formulate an ink that wouldn’t run or smudge, and determine the precise pressure needed to transfer letters onto paper. Prior to becoming famous for his printing press, he first invented a new technology for polishing gemstones.

Alberti’s interest in science and technology, combined with his association with artists resulted in his first book, On Painting, which demonstrated how to create three-dimensional images using the concept of perspective. His fascination with architecture and engineering resulted in a second book, On The Art of Building, which led to his work in designing some Italy’s famous churches. Alberti’s curiosity took him in many directions. In 1450 he designed the first machine for measuring wind speed. In 1467, he invented the cipher wheel for encoding messages.

Leonardo da Vinci is a name that is synonymous with the Renaissance because he is so well known as an artist, scientist, and inventor. He also worked as a military engineer and architect. He studied botany, geology, aerodynamics, mathematics, and human anatomy. The Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, two of da Vinci’s most famous paintings are known all over the world, but he is equally famous for in experiments with parachutes, helicopters and airplanes.

Mercator taught mathematics, geography, and cosmography and was skilled in the use of Italic script. These interests served him well when he began working to make maps, globes and scientific instruments. In 1569, Mercator produced a new map and atlas that enabled explorers to more successfully navigate their way around the world.

Galileo’s contributions to the science of astronomy included confirming the earlier work of Copernicus, improving the telescope, and discovering the moons of Jupiter. He also designed a pendulum clock. His mathematical skills added to our understanding of mechanics and the laws of motion.

As with the other volumes in the series, readers are challenged to ask questions and use critical thinking skills in response to a series of hands-on projects that are offered at the end of each chapter. Photographs highlight the subjects and provide historical context. Multiple text boxes offer additional facts, quotes, and insights on a variety of topics from Renaissance women to the Chinese invention of the toothbrush. Calls to action are strategically placed throughout: Wonder Why? poses additional questions for consideration.  Connect contains QR codes for audio and video files. Words of Wonder directs readers to a multi-page glossary at the end of the book. Resources provides a list of books, videos, and museums for further exploration.

The book is well organized and the content expands on familiar facts and introduces readers to details that are often overlooked. It is not only educational, but is also a pleasure to read. The text and illustrations are richly detailed. The conversational tone and age-appropriate vocabulary is appealing.
Recommended for STEM home and school libraries.

Friday, May 3, 2019

Picture Book Friday


The Hug by Eoin McLaughlin, with illustrations by Polly Dunbar, is a perfectly charming picture book formatted to create a pair of stories that mirror each other and meet in the middle.



Hedgehog is sad and needs a hug, but he’s simply too prickly and his forest friends invent imaginative excuses to delay. Fox is in a hurry to go knock over a garbage bin – Squirrel must count his three acorns … again – Magpie needs to sing a very, very long song. McLaughlin balances Hedgehog’s need with the other animals’ genuine concern about being poked as they endeavor to evade their friend’s request. Eventually, wise Owl encourages tearful Hedgehog to remember that although he’s “a little bit tricky to hug … there’s someone for everyone.”

The next turn of the page proves Owl correct. For there is Tortoise, perfectly armored against all those prickles. The two rush into each other’s arms, “As happy as two someones can be.” Readers then discover the book can be flipped and read from the back with the Tortoise on a similar quest, but his hard shell is equally unappealing for Badger, Rabbit, and Frog when they are asked for a hug.

Dunbar’s delicate watercolors leave plenty of clean space on the cream-colored pages to enable the well-drawn characters to shine. The magical moment, when Hedgehog and Tortoise hug, culminates in soft, swirling lines and dancing stars that surround the pair as their dream is realized.

McLaughlin’s thoughtful use of simple words and sentence structure creates a text that is accessible for young readers and the story would also be a delightful read-aloud selection.
Recommended for home and school libraries. 

Monday, April 29, 2019

Nonfiction Monday


The Renaissance Thinkers with History Projects for Kids, by Diane C. Taylor is part of the Renaissance For Kids Series from Nomad Press. In this volume, Taylor structures her work around chapter biographies of Filippo Brunelleschi, Niccolo Machiavelli, Thomas More, Nicolaus Copernicus, and Francis Bacon as a means of introducing readers to some of the most influential thinkers of that time.


An introduction examines the Renaissance in terms of economic change, religious conflict, technological advances, and the effects of humanism. Each chapter utilizes primary sources and a timeline to trace important life stages from early years through the influences that shaped each thinker, to their greatest areas of impact and on to their legacy. And finally, readers are confronted with interesting topics to consider and/or debate. How have the innovations utilized by Brunelleschi in designing the Florence Cathedral influenced architecture? Do “The ends justify the means” as Machiavelli contended? How has Thomas More’s concept of Utopia been interpreted by writers in the present day? Why did it take so long for the discovery, by astronomer Copernicus, that the earth revolved around the sun to be accepted as fact[J1] ? In what way does the scientific method described by Francis Bacon shape modern research?
Readers are challenged to ask questions and use critical thinking skills in response to a series of hands-on projects that are offered at the end of each chapter. Photographs highlight the subjects and provide historical context. Multiple text boxes offer additional facts, quotes, and insights to broaden the scope of each concept. Calls to action are strategically placed throughout: Wonder Why? poses additional questions for consideration.  Connect contains QR codes for audio and video files. Words of Wonder directs readers to a multi-page glossary at the end of the book. Resources provides a list of books, videos, and museums for further exploration.
The book is fascinating, informative, and a pleasure to read. The text and illustrations are richly detailed. The book is identified as being for ages 10-15. The conversational tone and age-appropriate vocabulary is appealing. However, conversations about the philosophical, political, and cultural atmospheres, particularly those related to Machiavelli and More, will benefit from adult guidance. The scientific material is clearer and provides easier discussion points.
Recommended for home and school libraries.

 [J1]

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

JUST LIKE GULLIVER earns award


I'm delighted to announce that JUST LIKE GULLIVER has been chosen to receive the Mom’s Choice Awards® Honoring Excellence Gold Seal and has been named as among the best in family-friendly media, products and services.



The adventure of a young groundhog who is frightened of his shadow until a fun-filled journey through the woods and farms surrounding his burrow allows him to discover his courage on Groundhog Day.

An author's note provides factual information about Groundhogs.

Cross curriculum connections for: Folklore, Shadows, Groundhog Day, and Groundhogs.

For more information visit my website: http://www.janetsquiresbooks.com/home.html
























Monday, April 22, 2019

Nonfiction Monday


The Renaissance Artists with History Projects for Kids, by Diane C. Taylor is part of the Renaissance For Kids Series from Nomad Press. In this volume, Taylor structures her work around chapter biographies of Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo, Raphael, and Titian as a means of introducing readers, ages 10-15, to both the works of these renown artists and the culture of their time.


An introduction establishes a foundation for the chapters that follow by defining the Renaissance, discussing humanism, and contrasting medieval art with that of the Renaissance. Attention is paid to the celebration of the human body as expressed though the nudes portrayed, the growth in the demand for portraiture, and the celebrity of artists. Each chapter utilizes primary sources and a timeline paired with a collection of paintings to illustrate important stages in the life of each artist: their childhood, training, patrons, the impact of Greek and Roman art, cultural influences, techniques, and legacy.
Readers are challenged to ask questions and use critical thinking skills in response to a series of hands-on projects that are offered at the end of each chapter. Photographs highlight the art work and multiple text boxes offer additional facts, quotes, and insights to broaden the scope of each concept. Calls to action are strategically placed throughout: Wonder Why? poses additional questions for consideration.  Connect contains QR codes for audio and video files. Words of Wonder directs readers to a multi-page glossary at the end of the book. Resources provides a list of books, videos, and museums for further exploration.
The book is enticing on so many levels and a pleasure to read. The conversational tone and age-appropriate vocabulary is appealing. The reproduced art work is vivid and varied. The text and illustrations are richly detailed. Recommended for home and school libraries.

Friday, April 19, 2019

Picture Book Friday


Just Read! by Lori Degman with illustrations by Victoria Tentler-Krylov is a charming celebration of the joy to be found in reading and an enthusiastic reminder of the amazing ways in which readers are able to explore a world outside their own.

“I read things that scare me or cause me to grin.
I read about places where I’ve never been.”



An energetic rhyming text enumerates the many times, places, and ways in which  diverse characters find opportunities to read.

“I read with my fingers across bumpy lines.
I read with my voice or my hands, using signs.”

Vibrant colors and an abundance of detail make the watercolor illustrations “pop” and invite readers to look closer as words conjure images for each young book-lover. I girl holds a book on code-breaking in one hand while she uses her other fingers to draw Morse code on a steamy window. A boy with a guitar searches through sheet music and song books.

Recommended as a fun addition to home and school libraries.

Monday, April 15, 2019

Nonfiction Monday


Baby Bear’s Adoption by Jennifer Keats Curtis with illustrations by Veronica V. Jones is a narrative nonfiction story based on the work of scientists at the Michigan Department of Natural Resources who save orphaned cubs.



Braden and Finley join their father, a wildlife biologist, as he locates a bear den and attaches a radio collar to the mother bear during her winter hibernation. Later, when an orphan is found, the reader follows the steps employed to locate and then persuade the bear to accept and raise an orphan with her own cubs.

The text provides excellent detail about the rescue process from beginning to end through young Braden’s point of view. The language is straight forward and the conversational tone is appealing. The youthful narrator’s voice invites readers to immerse themselves in the shared experience.

Like other Arbordale titles, there is a special four-part section at the end of the book titled FOR CREATIVE MINDS. Black Bear Life Cycle challenges readers to place six statements in their correct chronological order to discover a missing word. Stages of Bear Hibernation guides readers through the process and discusses ongoing studies of bear hibernation.  Q & A with Bear Biologist Mark Boersen offers additional detailed information about orphan rescue. Furry Fun Facts compares and contrasts the three types of North American Bears: Black Bear, Grizzly Bear, and Polar Bear.

The richly-detailed illustrations provide a lovely visual context and perfectly compliment the story.

Recommended for STEM for nature studies, biology, and wildlife content.
Ideal for home and school libraries.

Friday, March 29, 2019

Picture Book Friday


Growing Season by author and illustrator Maryann Cocca-Leffler is a charming story of friendship and expectations for children 4-8.



El and Jo are best friends. They are also the shortest kids in class, and they bond over the many ways they are alike. But come spring, Jo starts to grow and suddenly, they aren’t so alike after all.

Cocca-Lefffler makes clever use of the notion that Spring is a time of change by selecting plants as stand-ins for El and Jo. When summer break arrives, each student gets to choose a flower to take home and plant. Jo is quick to take a blooming Zinnia. Little El has a difficult time reaching the shelf and by the time she does, there’s only a very small, very plain Aster left that doesn’t have a single blossom. Jo is leaving on vacation, so she gifts her friend with the Zinnia and El devotes herself to caring for the two very different flowers. She plants them side-by-side, waters them, and talks to them. Despite all her care, the Aster doesn’t seem likely to ever catch up with the beautiful Zinnia.  Jo’s return is celebrated with a visit to the garden, where El discovers that her Aster has finally blossomed and so has, she!

The bright watercolor illustrations are a perfect compliment for the lively text. An author’s note on the last page, PLANT LIFE CYCLES, highlights fun facts and offers information about how annual, perennial, and biennial flowers grow.

This is a wonderful book to add to your spring collection purely for the delight of reading. It’s also an ideal choice for introducing the topic of plants or encouraging a discussion of change.

Recommended for home, school, and library collections.

Monday, March 25, 2019

Nonfiction Monday


ANIMAL NOSES by nature photographer Mary Holland introduces young readers to variations and adaptations of noses in this new addition to her award-winning Animal Anatomy series.



Eye-catching closeups are underscored by age appropriate text that offers insights into the many ways animals use their noses for survival. Although written with children in mind, adults will learn new facts as well. Polar bears can smell seals through 3 feet of ice. Deer lick their noses to keep them wet because scents stick to wet noses better than to dry ones. A Beaver has valves in its nose that close to keep water out when the beaver is under water. Fascinating!

The book identifies an audience of ages 5-9. Young readers will enjoy the strong visual impact of the images and benefit from reading with an adult or older sibling. Experienced readers will find the text engaging and will discover more information in the final section titled For Creative Minds where additional discussions review the many specific ways in which animals utilize their noses. A “Sense of Smell” page explains how the sense of smell works. “Fun Facts” provides an assortment of details:  many fish have a well-developed sense of smell, people can detect a trillion distinct scents. “Match the Nose” challenges readers to identify photos of animal noses.  “Animals With a Very Good Sense of Smell” provides examples of mammals, fish, insects, and birds

The publisher, Arbordale, has aligned this book to NGSS, Core, and state standards. An extensive teaching activities guide is available on Arbordalepublishing.com.

An excellent STEM resource. Recommended for home, school, and library.

Friday, March 22, 2019

Picture Book Friday


A Little Chicken by Tammi Sauer with illustrations by Dan Taylor is a light-hearted story for young readers. Chicken is afraid of a great many things: bears, butterflies, wolves, spiders, even garden gnomes. 



But when she accidentally sends a soon-to-hatch egg rolling out of the nest, she must confront her fears as she sets off in hot pursuit. It’s one failed attempt after another, before she finally recovers the egg just in time to welcome her new baby sister into the world and become a hero in the process.

Sauer’s prose is playful and rhythmic; the humorous tone is engaging. The brief text allows the colorful illustrations to contribute to the storytelling experience and makes for a fun read aloud for children and adults.

Monday, March 18, 2019

Nonfiction Monday


Dear Komodo Dragon by Nancy Kelly Allen with illustrations by Laurie Allen Klein takes a unique approach to introducing young readers to the life of the Komodo Dragon by shaping the text as letters exchanged between pen pals.  


A young girl, who aspires to be a dragon hunter, sets out to learn all she can about her Komodo Dragon correspondent. In the process, a wealth of facts are revealed about the largest lizard on the planet. These remarkable carnivores are endangered and, by the end of the book, the young scribe has decided to become an advocate for the Komodo instead of a hunter.

The end of the book contains a CREATIVE MINDS section that provides additional information. Dragons by the Numbers highlights facts such as: Komodo dragons can go 1 month without eating and can live 30 years. Conservation discusses the efforts of scientists, in Indonesia and zoos around the world, to protect these rare creatures. Physical and Behavioral Adaptations defines both terms and provides examples of each. It also challenges readers to identify which traits are physical and which are behavioral.

Recommended as a fun and informative read to include in STEM home and school libraries.

Friday, March 15, 2019

Picture Book Friday


My Bed Is an Air Balloon by Julia Copus with illustrations by Alison Jay is an imaginative bedtime story told in rhyme.




Both words and pictures carry readers through a fanciful world where a cozy bed transforms from hot-air balloon to sailing boat as it carries a pair of young dreamers from one fantastical encounter to another. 

The gentle rhythm and soft-edged images create a dreamy landscape of “velvet-nosed floogs” and “whifflepigs” that can be read from both front and back in this mirrored story that features two front covers. A boy begins the journey floating “above treetops where fluttertufts are sleeping” and drifting over “ponds strung with starlight that glitter like glass.” When he reaches the book’s center high among the clouds, he meets a girl in a colorful double page spread. At the next page turn, her encounters spread across the remaining pages in reverse.

A charming tale for bedtime reading with children 3-6.

Monday, March 11, 2019

Nonfiction Monday


CHEETAH DREAMS by Linda Stanek with illustrations by Shennen Bersani introduces young readers to the remarkable life and habitat of cheetahs through the use of a smart, innovative text that combines lyrical storytelling with factual sidebars. 



Beautifully illustrated double-page spreads pull the two distinct styles together with visually stunning detail.

Cheetahs are one of the most endangered cats in Africa due to loss of habitat and competition from both wild predators and humans. CHEETAH DREAMS imagines a world in which cheetahs survive because readers become better informed about the challenges these remarkable cats face and come to appreciate their unique qualities.

The text does an excellent job of providing information about the way in which cheetahs live and the many adaptations that distinguish cheetahs from the other big cats. Cleat-like feet, tear-marked faces together with exceptionally large hearts and lungs enable cheetahs to hunt prey at speeds unequaled by predators such as lions or leopards.

The book concludes with a section titled FOR CREATIVE MINDS which provides teaching materials. Cheetah’s and the Big Cat Cousins is a compare and contrast activity. Cheetah Conservation offers maps and text for a more in-depth look at the issue of cheetah survival. Cheetah Adaptations combines text and pictures to build on earlier information. A final section, Purr or Roar, examines how and why cats are unable to do both.

Recommended as an excellent STEM resource for both home and school libraries.

Friday, March 8, 2019

Picture Book Friday


STAY, BENSON by Thereza Rowe is a light-hearted romp as readers follow a dog named Benson on a day of adventure.



When Flick leaves for school, she tells Benson to “stay and watch the house. No chasing.” But Benson escapes out the back door and the chase is on. Pursuit of a cat in the garden leads to a squirrel in a tree, a ball on the playground, and ultimately to snatching a snack from a picnic in the park…and all just in time to slip back into the house one step ahead of Flick, who remains unaware of Benson’s behavior. 

Young readers will enjoy knowing they are part of the secret trick that Benson plays on Flick.  The book further enhances reader fun with bold images, strong primary colors, and cleverly designed cut-outs that pull readers from one page to the next as they follow Benson’s escapade.

Monday, February 25, 2019

Nonfiction Monday

Lakes and Ponds!With 25 Science Projects for Kids by Johannah Haney with illustrations by Tom Casteel invites readers from 7-10 to discover the fascinating plants animals that are dependent on lakes and ponds for survival.


The introduction explains, in reader-friendly language, how the many types of lakes such as crater lakes, tectonic lakes, and extraterrestrial lakes are formed and provides examples of each. In addition, it details how good science practices will facilitate completing the ongoing science projects that appear throughout the book at the conclusion of each chapter.
The well-organized and engaging chapters that follow encourage youthful scientists to explore multiple topics:
Why Lakes And Ponds Are Important discusses the water cycle and the value of water for drinking, food, and as an energy source.
Humans, Lakes, and Ponds identifies how transportation, exploration, and industry such as aquaculture are water-dependent.
Animals in Lakes and Ponds explores a variety of creatures from the brine shrimp of the Great Salt Lake of Utah to the amphibians, reptiles, mammals, and birds that call aquatic habitats home.
Plants in Lakes and Ponds looks at the vast number of species that exist in salt water or fresh water.
Changing Lakes and Ponds offers readers a chance to see the many ways that seasonal changes alter aquatic environments in the short term and also looks at the broader influence of climate change.
Practicing Conservation pulls details from the previous chapters together to explain how to preserve and protect these valuable resources.
Cartoon-style illustrations are augmented here and there with photographs to create visual interest. Text boxes set out challenges labeled INVESTIGATE or CONSIDER AND DISCUSS. WORDS TO KNOW defines important vocabulary. DID YOU KNOW? highlights special facts. Each chapter concludes with a series of hands-on STEM projects to enable students to reinforce learning, enhance understanding, and develop critical thinking skills.
Recommended as useful STEM resource for home, school, and library collections.


The Gingerbread Cowboy Book Trailer